awkwardsituationist:

photos by mohammad reza domiri ganji in iran of: (1) the dome of the seyyed mosque in isfahan; (2,8) the nasīr al mulk mosque, or pink mosque, in shiraz; (3,4) the vakil mosque in shiraz; (5) the ceiling of the fifth floor of ali qapu in isfahan; (6,10) the vakil bathhouse in shiraz; (7) the imam mosque in isfahan; (9) the jame mosque of yazd

(via vincecarters)

vuls:

My physics teacher hates me because all I do is draw in his class

vuls:

My physics teacher hates me because all I do is draw in his class

(via soiwalked-intothehaze)

f-stop-fitzgerald:

Blood Moon Eclipse (4/14-15/14)

Anaheim, CA

Canon EOS 5D Mk III, 200MM Lens, f/32 1/4”-10” ISO 100-3200

(via mistydazed)

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.
The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.
In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.

In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

septagonstudios:

Ekaterina Koroleva ON TUMBLR

septagonstudios:

Ekaterina Koroleva ON TUMBLR

vanished:

Anne Ten Donkelaar - Flower Constructions

(via vincecarters)

fuckyeahncisgifs:

ncis → silhouettes

(via movingearths)

jamescharlick:

City Living (by jamescharlick)

Yangon (also known as Rangoon, and meaning “End of Strife”) is a former capital of Myanmar (Burma). Although the military government has officially relocated the capital to Naypyidaw since March 2006, Yangon, with a population of over five million, continues to be the country’s largest city and the most important commercial centre.

Yangon’s infrastructure is undeveloped compared to those of other major cities in Southeast Asia, and while many high-rise residential and commercial buildings have been constructed or renovated throughout downtown and Greater Yangon in the past two decades, many remain in poor states of repair and most satellite towns that ring the city continue to be deeply impoverished.

I really like this type of photo and I’d have liked to get more similar shots, but taking photos from the hotel balcony means you need to stay in more than one place to get more than one photo. Which we didn’t.

jamescharlick:

City Living (by jamescharlick)

Yangon (also known as Rangoon, and meaning “End of Strife”) is a former capital of Myanmar (Burma). Although the military government has officially relocated the capital to Naypyidaw since March 2006, Yangon, with a population of over five million, continues to be the country’s largest city and the most important commercial centre.

Yangon’s infrastructure is undeveloped compared to those of other major cities in Southeast Asia, and while many high-rise residential and commercial buildings have been constructed or renovated throughout downtown and Greater Yangon in the past two decades, many remain in poor states of repair and most satellite towns that ring the city continue to be deeply impoverished.

I really like this type of photo and I’d have liked to get more similar shots, but taking photos from the hotel balcony means you need to stay in more than one place to get more than one photo. Which we didn’t.

nevver:

Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket, James Whistler

nevver:

Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket, James Whistler

(via thegoddessofthorns)

artchipel:

Kylli Sparre aka Sparrek - The guardian

artchipel:

Kylli Sparre aka Sparrek - The guardian