monicalewinsky1996:

cindymayweather:

"One fun fact I learned while on the air with Keith Olbermann was that humans on the Internet are scumbags. People say children are cruel, but I was never made fun of as a child or an adult. Suddenly, my disability on the world wide web is fair game. I would look at clips online and see comments like, "Yo, why’s she tweakin?" "Yo, is she retarded?" And my favorite, "Poor Gumby-mouth terrorist. What does she suffer from? We should really pray for her." One commenter even suggested that I add my disability to my credits: screenwriter, comedian, palsy."

Maysoon Zayid on TEDWomen (x)

this is SO IMPORTANT I AM YELLING

(via burnslikeabluedream)

(Source: damianodefense, via themysteryvanishing)

wordsforstrangers:

selections from “nejma” by nayyirah waheed

wordsforstrangers:

selections from “nejma” by nayyirah waheed

(via easylion)

"

Not saying Quvenzhané’s name is an attempt, consciously or unconsciously, to step around and contain her blackness. Yes, sometimes black people have names that are difficult to pronounce. There aren’t many people of European descent named Shaniqua or Jamal. Names are as big a cultural marker as brown skin and kinky hair, and there’s long been backlash against both of those things (see: perms, skin bleaching creams, etc.). The insistence on not using Quvenzhané’s name is an extension of that “why aren’t you white?” backlash.

It is easier to be colorblind, to simply turn a blind eye to the differences that have torn this nation apart for centuries than it is to wade through those choppy waters. And Quvenzhané’s very existence is enough to make the societal majority uncomfortable. She is talented, successful, beautiful, happy, loved, and adored–all things that many people don’t figure that little black girls with “black” names could, or should, be. Their answer? Let’s make her more palatable. If she insists on not fitting the mold of the ghetto hoodrat associated with women with “urban” names, let’s take her own urban name away from her.

Refusing to learn how to pronounce Quvenzhané’s name says, pointedly, you are not worth the effort. The problem is not that she has an unpronounceable name, because she doesn’t. The problem is that white Hollywood, from Ryan Seacrest and his homies to the AP reporter who decided to call her “Annie” rather than her real name, doesn’t deem her as important as, say, Renee Zellwegger, or Zach Galifinakis, or Arnold Schwarzenegger, all of whom have names that are difficult to pronounce–but they manage. The message sent is this: you, young, black, female child, are not worth the time and energy it will take me to learn to spell and pronounce your name. You will be who and what I want you to be; you be be who and what makes me more comfortable. I will allow you to exist and acknowledge that existence, but only on my terms.

"

Brokey McPoverty, “What’s In A Name? Kind Of A Lot,” PostBourgie 2/26/13 (via racialicious)

READ IT. THEN READ IT AGAIN.

(via asubmissiveintraining)

This is so very important.  That girl’s name is as beautiful as she is, and she deserves to be treated with respect.

(via tamorapierce)

(via burnslikeabluedream)

brb going to read mockingjay.

danielradcliffes:

Patina Miller in the Mockingjay teaser [x]

danielradcliffes:

Patina Miller in the Mockingjay teaser [x]

(via tonywinnerlenahall)

aurelie-dupont:

American Ballet Theatre corps Kaho Ogawa 10 pirouettes

aurelie-dupont:

American Ballet Theatre corps Kaho Ogawa 10 pirouettes

darlingdormer:

Natalie as Cressida in the new ‘Mockingjay: Part 1’ trailer [x]

(via prolethean)

(Source: expensivelife)

(Source: beyonce-instagram, via swaans)